Research Seminar: Disrupting Narratives about Islam: Medieval and Contemporary Perspectives

School Seminar Series: Disrupting Narratives about Islam: Medieval and Contemporary Perspectives

This year's seminars inlcude:

  • Muslims, Miracles and Superstition in Latin Christian Narratives of the First Crusade
  • Islam and the end of multiculturalism? Reconsidering its promise
  • Prof. Deborah Brown, Discussant

 

 

Books

Muslims, Miracles and Superstition in Latin Christian Narratives of the First Crusade (HPI Research Seminar)

17 May 2019 11:00am1:00pm
According to Robert the Monk (writing c. 1110), there was a period of truce between the armies of the First Crusade and the Turkish governor of Antioch Yaghi-Siyan in 1098. Robert tells us that during that truce a crusade leader by the name of Bohemond, and a Turk called Firuz, sat down together to discuss the technicalities of a miraculous host of saintly knights seen aiding the crusaders in battle. Using this episode as a point of departure, I will discuss how twelfth-century Latin Christian narratives of the First Crusade frame Muslim encounters with the miraculous and the association between Muslims and theologically illicit practices like sorcery and judicial astrology. I will argue that, rather than using these themes to present a consistently negative image of Muslims, many of these narratives engage in a form of ‘moderated Othering’.
Books

Islam and the end of multiculturalism? Reconsidering its promise (HPI Research Seminar)

17 May 2019 11:00am1:00pm
Islam is credited with bringing about the end of multiculturalism, coinciding with the rise of far right-wing populism in Europe. In this talk I explore this purported end within the peculiarity of British Multiculturalism and do so from a unique vantage point: the intimate surrounds of a probation office and the relationships between probation staff and Muslim ex-offenders based on fieldwork in East London. From this vantage point, multiculturalism is far from being either alive or dead, but is instead negotiated and characterized by tensions intrinsic to the ‘cruel dynamic of inclusion and exclusion’ that has long characterized the Western tradition of citizenship.