Summer Research Scholarships

Summer Research Scholarships are an opportunity for undergraduate and some postgraduate students to get involved in an exciting research project within the School during the summer.

Program dates

November - February (10 weeks)

Deadline

The deadline for applications for the 2016/2017 scholarships has now passed.

Further information

Please contact the Academic Administrator for further information or any questions related to the School's summer research scholarships.

The guidelines and application form are available from the UQ Summer Research Program page.

The School incorporates four main disciplinary areas:

Classics and Ancient History

Ancient Greek and Latin, and the history of early Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome and the Celts.

Studies in Religion

The study of various religious and spiritual experiences and practices, including the study of the major world religions, as well as new religious movements, religion and the environment, paganism and esotericism.

Philosophy

The appraisal of argument, the nature of thinking, the nature of the mind that thinks and what it thinks about.

History

Australian, British and European, Asian, Pacific, the Middle East, the United States, and thematic areas.

Summer Research Scholarships 2019-2020

Project One

Project title: 

Epigraphy and the Indian Epics

Project duration:

10 weeks

Description:

South and Southeast Asia contain an enormous number of inscriptions in Sanskrit and other languages. Many of these inscriptions have been published in collections such as Epigraphia Indica, Epigraphia Carnatica, and similar series, which represent an immense resource for exploring the regions' cultures and histories. The successful applicant for this scholarship will use these resources to map the ways in which characters and themes from the two great Indian epics, the Mahābhārata and Rāmāyaṇa, were deployed in these inscriptions. The data from this survey will help to determine the thematic, temporal and geographic scope of the popularising of the epics. The scholar will OCR the many volumes of inscriptions (available in most cases in existing digital scans), search for relevant terms, and then tabulate and map the data. If time is sufficient, an associated written project will also be developed.

Expected hours per week:

20 hours/week

Expected outcomes and deliverables:

The scholar will gain skills in using epigraphic data for investigating historical and cultural questions. The scholar will become familiar with the complexity of inscriptions in the designated regions, and develop skills in analysing their contents. This may lead to publications in the future. Time permitting, the scholar will also develop an associated written project.

Suitable for:

This scholarship is open to students who have a background in the study of Indian culture and history. Some knowledge of Sanskrit is preferable.

Primary Supervisor:

Dr Adam Bowles

Further info:

Adam Bowles, a.bowles1@uq.edu.au

Project Two

Project title: 

Film and Non-violent Resistance

Project duration:

10 weeks

Expected hours per week:

20 hours per week

Description:

The aim of this project is to investigate the contribution of philosophical films to understanding a range of ways in which authoritarian and totalitarian states can be resisted: through protest and amelioration of conditions, through legal contestation, such as plebiscites and strikes, through exile, and through truth-speaking. Each of the means used to resist are non-violent and the project explores the possibilities of non-violent resistance as they are articulated through film. The textual sources used for the project will include discussions of the films, film-philosophy and philosophical theorising about resistance to totalitarianism, such as the work of Hannah Arendt, Howard Caygill, Drew Dalton, and Todd May on resistance. This project will advance thought in political philosophy and film-philosophy through considering the unique contribution of cinema to understanding non-violent resistance, by focusing on the philosophical accounts that film, crossing genres between documentary and dramatic film, and across time and different regimes, such as the apartheid regime in South Africa, the German Democratic Republic, the Chilean Civic-Military Dictatorship and contemporary Saudi Arabia, Iran, and Indonesia can provide. Students working on the project can choose the films to work on in consultation.

Expected outcomes and deliverables:

The student should be able to produce a well-polished paper between 6,000-10,000 words. That paper may be submitted for publication if appropriate. In any case, the student should present the paper as a talk towards the end of the project.

The student will also learn skills in researching in philosophy, the area of film-philosophy and relevant work in film studies, and research assistance, using library searches and internet searches.

Suitable for:

This project is open to students with a background in philosophy, and could also be suitable for students with a background in film studies. Ideally they will be in a later stage of their degree, in second year at the earliest.

Primary Supervisor:

 

Associate Professor Marguerite La Caze

Further info:

Applicants can contact Marguerite La Caze: m.lacaze@uq.edu.au